Global Philanthropy Partnership Reports

Meeting the Challenge: Opportunities for Midwest Action on Climate Change Meeting the Challenge: Opportunities for Midwest Action on Climate Change
April 2007
By Julia Parzen and Adele Simmons
 
Midwest Climate Change Leadership Inventory Midwest Climate Change Leadership Inventory
April 2007
By Julia Parzen and Adele Simmons, with research assistance from David Denker
 
Meeting the Challenge: Opportunities for Midwest Action on Climate Change Executive Summary Meeting the Challenge: Opportunities for Midwest Action on Climate Change Executive Summary

Published with a grant from the Energy Foundation, these reports grew out of a Midwest Climate Change Workshop in December 2005 that brought together a group of business, civil society, government and union representatives from across the region to consider what a regional approach to climate change ight look like and to identify areas of greatest convergence. That Workshop (sponsored by the Joyce Foundation and the British Consulate General of Chicago) noted that the American Midwest is the source of almost 5% of the world’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. While its governments, corporations, and civil society groups have taken some action, the Midwest lags far behind the coasts in coordinated programs and policies to reduce GHG emissions. In the absence of federal action, states and cities must take – and are taking – the lead. A strong regional voice united around a set of climate and energy policies will be the most effective action of all.

These reports identify and recommend actions that can be taken in the short- and medium-term by various sectors working regionally.

 
Midwest Climate Change Leadership Inventory Blended Value Investing:
Capital Opportunities for Social and Environmental Impact

March 2006
By Jed Emerson and Joshua Spitzer with Gary Mulhair

Published by the World Economic Forum with the support of the Cisco Foundation, this paper explores examples of how various investors and philanthropists are structuring capital to create financial returns with social and environmental impacts. Loan guarantees, securitizations and private equity investing, among other examples, are each explored through a number of case studies.

 
The Changing Aid Architecture: Can Global Initiatives Eradicate Poverty? The Changing Aid Architecture: Can Global Initiatives Eradicate Poverty?
By Uma Lele, Nafis Sadik, Adele Simmons

Recently almost all the major official donors of aid have promised to double their aid levels. And new champions of the global poor, notably Gates, Bono, Buffett, and Clinton, have helped to dramatically raise aid funding from unconventional sources. But what the new resources achieve will depend greatly on how they are channeled. A larger share of official development assistance now goes through partnership based global programs. Recent evaluations of global programs raise doubts about the wisdom of some popular approaches and suggest directions for reform of the aid architecture.